Archive for November, 2010

Turquoise Earrings

Friday, November 5th, 2010

Turquoise Earrings by Durango Silver CoDurango Silver Company has just completed a great presentation page on Turquoise Earrings that we think you will enjoy. You can view our page on Turquoise Earrings which includes lots of photos with descriptions now.

Turquoise Earrings have been worn by people of different cultures worldwide for well over 6,000 years now as Turquoise was one of the first gemstones found by man. In many cultures including Native American Indians, men were the first to wear Turquoise attached to their ear.

Turquoise Earrings vary greatly in style and color by the culture of the area where they were made as well as the type of Turquoise used in the Earrings. This particular presentation page is predominantly about Turquoise Earrings made in the Southwest United States region. Future presentations will follow on Turquoise Earrings made in other areas of the world which is equally as interesting.

This presentation has information aboutTurquoise Beaded Earrings by Durango Silver Co Southwest Turquoise Earrings, Navajo Turquoise Earrings, Zuni Turquoise Earrings, Turquoise Bead Earrings, Blue Turquoise Earrings, Green Turquoise Earrings along with different type of earrings such as studs, hoops and dangle Earrings with Turquoise. There is even a video on Turquoise Earrings included in this page. We show photos of Earrings and explain how they are made and who they are made by. We show you many different types of Earrings with Turquoise from Nevada, Arizona and  Colorado. This presentation is a great place to learn a lot about Turquoise Earrings and we invite you to come and see our page.

When your there take a look at the video that Dillon and Nattarika made!

We hope you enjoy our presentation, if you like it join our newsletter as we will be making a lot of great pages on Turquoise Jewelry, its past, present and even how to make it!

Pawn Indian Jewelry

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010

Pawn Indian Jewelry – Old Pawn Turquoise is when the person who pawned their Jewelry or other belonging failed to make an interest payment or pay the item off from the Indian Trader. Usually, the Indian Trader will give the person who pawned the item a grace period, however, once it is pulled for being delinquent the pawn Indian Jewelry becomes available for sale to the public.

Visit our Pawn Indian Jewelry presentation page for more information, photos and descriptions.

Pawn Indian Jewelry is most often sold for much less than new Indian Jewelry as it is considered used. The formula is simple, the cost the Indian Trader paid for the pawn Indian Jewelry, a minimal profit for his investment, plus the amount of the unpaid interest on the item. That’s it! – If you are the person wanting to buy old pawn Turquoise when it is pulled and put out for sale, you can get great bargains and even get a rare piece of Antique Indian Jewelry, “Vintage Native American Jewelry,”for a fraction of its value.

Navajo Silversmith History

Monday, November 1st, 2010

Navajo Silversmith HistoryNavajo Silversmithing began about one hundred fifty years ago when a Navajo Blacksmith named Atsidi Sani was shown how to work with Silver by the Spaniards. The Spaniards were coming up to the Southwestern United States seeking Gold and Silver and the Native American Indians admired the shiny Silver ornamentation on the horse gear that the Spaniards had. They had fancy horse bridles and bits, spurs and even Silver on their saddles.

Atsidi taught the art of Navajo Silversmithing to other Navajo Indians and Navajo Silversmithing spread throughout the Navajo Nation quickly as the Navajo people loved Silver. The Navajo Silversmiths would melt down silver coins they got from the U.S. Calvary, then the Trading Posts and Indian Traders.

It was around 1865 when Atsidi Sani began producing Silver buttons which were called conchos. The Native American Indians loved the shiny conchos and soon began embellishing their clothing and then Jewelry. It was not long and the Natives were putting Silver on their leather utensils, bags and so on.

It was about 1880 when the Navajo Silversmiths began incorporating Turquoise into their Silversmithing. When the Navajo Silversmiths started using Turquoise, a giant demand for their Jewelry began with the Native American Indians throughout the Southwest and quickly spread to other American Indian communities as well.

The Traders to the Navajo also appreciated Turquoise Jewelry and brought it to the marketplace in California where it was quickly accepted and appreciated by the city people.

Durango Silver Company has made a nice presentation page on Navajo Silversmithing and the history of Navajo Silversmithing, it has a lot of great information and photos for you to learn more if you are interested. You can view our presentation on our website at Navajo Silversmithing History.

We are creating additional pages on 

antique zuni jewelry, native american zuni, american indian navajo, american indian necklace, american indian pendant, american indians navajo, antique navajo jewelry, authentic navajo jewelry, jewelry navajo and native american jewelry navajo. We will creat Word Press Blogs as soon as these pages are finished.